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The Goodly Mist
A Workingblog for Rob Sherman
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⚞ clipping?

Biography remains extremely popular, because humanising the political process is an effective way of communicating it to the reader. The genre favours colourful individuals and those who put themselves against established structures and assumptions. In comparison with narratives of this sort, politics treated as a flexible arrangement for dealing with awkward problems, without many dramatic […]

Constantin Brâncusi, Bird In Space

There’s a million lines of code in there… and nowhere in there will you find the word ‘boat’. Michael Lewis, The New New Thing

Pippin Barr, v r 3 “The irony of software designers tricking us into believing water is real by observing nature more carefully than we often do, is quite amusing and perhaps a sign of the times, or things to come.” Tristan Gooley, How To Read Water

“I should not have been surprised by Constable or Rubens. This is what the great artists manage. They flatter us, by observing better than others and then speaking to each of us as individuals and in language that we worry we may be the only ones left caring for.” Tristan Gooley, How To Read Water

A handy little driblet of JQuery and CSS here: on a few of my websites, I have .scrollableelements with more information than can fit within a single browser height, but which need to scroll independently of the page’s main content. Often, just setting the overflow to scroll, and using the browser’s default scrollbar, will look […]

“The only thing that bound us together was this belief: in every other country they eat unspeakable food; worship gods more see-through than glass; string together only the most meaningless syllables, like goo-goo-goo-goo-goo-goo-goo; are warlike but not noble; do not help the dead cross in the proper boats; do not send the correct incense up […]

The Denham Tracts, James Hardy (eds.), The Folklore Society, 1895, vol. 2, pp. 76-80.

Bill Marsh, Landscapes, 2002

The relationship between remembering and forgetting is, paradoxically, related to the relationship between memorials and ruins. Novelist Robert Musil published an essay on ‘Monuments’ in 1936, noting how much of his native city of Vienna was crowded with memorials to soldiers, statesmen and illustrious figures, forgotten ever after. ‘There is nothing in this world as […]

Max Ernst, Forest and Dove

“Ticket to Ride is essentially about connecting points on a graph. All games are ultimately abstract simulations, although sometimes the thing simulated is itself abstract. Computer gaming has been going in two primary directions as of late: in action games, towards greater simulation of reality (or projected reality), and in casual and role-playing games, towards […]

Untitled, Unica Zürn, 1960s

Hybrid, Jenny Saville

“Writers must eat too, but why crusade for further perpetuation of the idea of art as commodity, art as a product no different from other things produced to function pleasantly within a market society? To crusade for the artist’s right to have work treated like any other commodity is to invalidate the subversive force of […]

“Is a democracy, such as we know it, the last improvement possible in government? Is it not possible to take a step further towards recognizing and organizing the rights of man? Here will never be a really free and enlightened State until the State comes to recognize the individual as a higher and independent power, […]

Chalk Paths, Eric Ravilious, 1935

Fan Hir, the Long Peak, looking south last February.

One of the things that it would certainly illustrate is that thought outstrips the number of atoms in the universe very quickly. Apparently we’re used to dealing intelligently with astronomically large combinatoria. I calculate that we take in somewhere between 360 and 480 mb/second in our visual, auditory, and tactile senses (combined). We probably don’t […]

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